More on that Korea Daily mess. Plus early detection of ASD does improve outcomes.

This podcast was going to be dedicated to new early detection research which shows what the USPSTF has been looking for – the link between early detection, early intervention, and improved outcomes in a community setting.  Those findings are still included this week, but there is a slight diversion in theme.  The podcast will also include  an explanation of the immune/microbiome study published in Nature and misrepresented  by Korea Daily.  The study is important, however, the media sensationalized the findings and did the research no favors by labeling it a “major cause”.   Learn what the study did and what it actually discovered in this week’s podcast.

 

Here are the references of the studies mentioned in the podcast:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28902840

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28905160

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27474118

 

 

A scary halloween story about the media misrepresenting science

How long do you have to study an intervention to see if it works?  Many scientists agree that it isn’t just about what happens in the short run, but if those interventions can be sustained for long periods of time.  In the case of very early interventions, it is now clear that treatment for about a year can change the trajectory of symptoms so those improvements are sustained, maintained or lead to even further improvements for 6 years after the initial intervention has stopped.  This important finding was hidden by the BBC getting the headline wrong and hiding the true value of the research at the end of the story.  This week’s podcast outlines the contribution of parent-implemented intervention and research studying autism even before symptoms emerge in improving trajectories rather than just immediate outcomes.  Happy Halloween!

A year of autism research in under 30 minutes

What was impactful this year in autism research? This last podcast of 2015 explores the year of the female, highlighting the relatively new exploration into what makes females with ASD different and what they can tell us about everybody with autism and their families.  Some of what is discussed was highlighted in other podcasts, but not all of it.   The summary is organized so that what may initially be interpreted as small, nonsignificant discoveries, are viewed as progress.  Everything from genetics to getting laws passed is included.